Conoscere l'Unione Europea - The Maastricht and Amsterdam Treaties - I trattati di Maastricht e di Amsterdam

Conoscere l'Unione Europea - The Maastricht and Amsterdam Treaties - I trattati di Maastricht e di Amsterdam

 

23.11.2017   12:00 -

Elio Cotronei release - 

The Maastricht and Amsterdam Treaties

The Maastricht Treaty altered the former European treaties and created a European Union based on three pillars: the European Communities, the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and cooperation in the field of justice and home affairs (JHI). With a view to the enlargement of the Union, the Amsterdam Treaty made the adjustments needed to enable the Union to function more efficiently and democratically.

I. The Maastricht Treaty

The Treaty on European Union, signed in Maastricht on 7 February 1992, entered into force on 1 November 1993.

a.The Union’s structures

By instituting a European Union, the Maastricht Treaty marked a new step in the process of creating an ‘ever-closer union among the peoples of Europe’. The Union was based on the European Communities (1.1.1 and 1.1.2) and supported by policies and forms of cooperation provided for in the Treaty on European Union. It had a single institutional structure, consisting of the Council, the European Parliament, the European Commission, the Court of Justice and the Court of Auditors which (being at the time strictly speaking the only EU institutions) exercised their powers in accordance with the Treaties. The Treaty established an Economic and Social Committee and a Committee of the Regions, which both had advisory powers. A European System of Central Banks and a European Central Bank were set up under the provisions of the Treaty in addition to the existing financial institutions in the EIB group, namely the European Investment Bank and the European Investment Fund.

b.The Union’s powers

The Union created by the Maastricht Treaty was given certain powers by the Treaty, which were classified into three groups and were commonly referred to as ‘pillars’: The first ‘pillar’ consisted of the European Communities, providing a framework within which the powers for which sovereignty had been transferred by the Member States in the areas governed by the Treaty were exercised by the Community institutions. The second ‘pillar’ was the common foreign and security policy laid down in Title V of the Treaty. The third ‘pillar’ was cooperation in the fields of justice and home affairs laid down in Title VI of the Treaty. Titles V and VI provided for intergovernmental cooperation using the common institutions, with certain supranational features such as involving the Commission and consulting Parliament.

1.The European Community (first pillar)

The Community’s task was to make the single market work and to promote, among other things, a harmonious, balanced and sustainable development of economic activities, a high level of employment and of social protection and equality between men and women. The Community pursued these objectives, acting within the limits of its powers, by establishing a common market and related measures set out in Article 3 of the EC Treaty and by initiating the economic and single monetary policy referred to in Article 4. Community activities had to respect the principle of proportionality and, in areas that did not fall within its exclusive competence, the principle of subsidiarity (Article 5 EC).

2.The common foreign and security policy (CFSP) (second pillar)

The Union had the task of defining and implementing, by intergovernmental methods, a common foreign and security policy (6.1.1). The Member States were to support this policy actively and unreservedly in a spirit of loyalty and mutual solidarity. Its objectives were: to safeguard the common values, fundamental interests, independence and integrity of the Union in conformity with the principles of the United Nations Charter; to strengthen the security of the Union in all ways; to promote international cooperation; to develop and consolidate democracy and the rule of law, and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms.

3.Cooperation in the fields of justice and home affairs (third pillar)

The Union’s objective was to develop common action in these areas by intergovernmental methods (5.12.1) to provide citizens with a high level of safety within an area of freedom, security and justice. It covered the following areas:

  • rules and the exercise of controls on crossing the Community’s external borders;
  • combating terrorism, serious crime, drug trafficking and international fraud;
  • judicial cooperation in criminal and civil matters;
  • creation of a European Police Office (Europol) with a system for exchanging information between national police forces;
  • controlling illegal immigration;
  • common asylum policy.

II. The Amsterdam Treaty

The Treaty of Amsterdam amending the Treaty on European Union, the Treaties establishing the European Communities and certain related acts, signed in Amsterdam on 2 October 1997, entered into force on 1 May 1999.

a.Increased powers for the Union

1.European Community

With regard to objectives, special prominence was given to balanced and sustainable development and a high level of employment. A mechanism was set up to coordinate Member States’ policies on employment, and there was a possibility of some Community measures in this area. The Agreement on Social Policy was incorporated into the EC Treaty with some improvements (removal of the opt-out). The Community method now applied to some major areas which had hitherto come under the ‘third pillar’ such as asylum, immigration, crossing external borders, combating fraud, customs cooperation and judicial cooperation in civil matters, in addition to some of the cooperation under the Schengen Agreement, which the EU and Communities endorsed in full.

2.European Union

Intergovernmental cooperation in the areas of police and judicial cooperation was strengthened by defining objectives and precise tasks and creating a new legal instrument similar to a directive. The instruments of the common foreign and security policy were developed later, in particular by creating a new instrument, the common strategy, a new office, the ‘Secretary-General of the Council responsible for the CFSP’, and a new structure, the ‘Policy Planning and Early Warning Unit’.

b.A stronger position for Parliament

1.Legislative power

Under the codecision procedure, which was extended to existing 15 legal bases under the EC Treaty, Parliament and the Council became co-legislators on a practically equal footing. Excepting only agriculture and competition policy, the codecision procedure applied to all the areas where the Council was permitted to take decisions by qualified majority. In four cases (Articles 18, 42 and 47 and Article 151 on cultural policy, which remained unchanged) the codecision procedure was combined with a requirement for a unanimous decision in the Council. The other legislative areas where unanimity was required were not subject to codecision.

2.Power of control

As well as voting to approve the Commission as a body, Parliament also had a vote to approve in advance the person nominated as President of the future Commission (Article 214).

3.Election and statute of Members

With regard to the procedure for elections to Parliament by direct universal suffrage (Article 190 EC), the Community’s power to adopt common principles was added to the existing power to adopt a uniform procedure. A legal basis making it possible to adopt a single statute for MEPs was included in the same article. However, there was still no provision allowing measures to develop political parties at European level (cf. Article 191).

c.Closer cooperation

For the first time, the Treaties contained general provisions allowing some Member States under certain conditions to take advantage of common institutions to organise closer cooperation between themselves. This option was in addition to the closer cooperation covered by specific provisions, such as economic and monetary union, creation of the area of freedom, security and justice and incorporating the Schengen provisions. The areas where closer cooperation was possible were the third pillar and, under particularly restrictive conditions, matters subject to non-exclusive Community competence. The conditions which any closer cooperation had to fulfil and the planned decision-making procedures had been drawn up in such a way as to ensure that this new factor in the process of integration would remain exceptional and, at all events, could only be used to move further towards integration and not to take retrograde steps.

d.Simplification

The Amsterdam Treaty removed from the European Treaties all provisions which the passage of time had rendered void or obsolete, while ensuring that this did not affect the legal effects which derived from them in the past. It also renumbered the Treaty articles. For legal and political reasons the Treaty was signed and submitted for ratification in the form of amendments to the existing Treaties.

e.Institutional reforms with a view to enlargement

a.The Amsterdam Treaty set the maximum number of Members of the European Parliament, in line with Parliament’s request, at 700 (Article 189).
b.The composition of the Commission and the question of weighted votes were covered by a ‘Protocol on the Institutions’ attached to the Treaty. This provided that, in a Union of up to 20 Member States, the Commission would comprise one national of each Member State, provided that by that date, weighting of the votes in the Council had been modified. At all events, at least a year before the 21st Member State joined, a new IGC would have to comprehensively review the Treaties’ provisions on the institutions.
c.There was provision for the Council to use qualified majority voting in a number of the legal bases newly established by the Amsterdam Treaty. However, of the existing Community policies, only research policy had new provisions on qualified majority voting, with other policies still requiring unanimity.

f.Other matters

A protocol covered Community procedures for implementing the principle of subsidiarity. New provisions on access to documents (Article 255) and greater openness in the Council’s legislative work (Article 207(3)) improved transparency.

Role of the European Parliament

The European Parliament was consulted before an intergovernmental conference was called. Parliament was also involved in the intergovernmental conferences according to ad hoc formulas; during the last three it was represented, depending on the case, by its President or by two of its members.

Petr Novak

 

 

Note sintetiche sull'Unione europea



    Introduzione Come funziona l'Unione europea L'Europa dei cittadini Il mercato interno Unione economica e monetaria Politiche settoriali Le relazioni esterne dell'UE Contenuto

I trattati di Maastricht e di Amsterdam

Il trattato di Maastricht ha modificato gli ex trattati europei e creato un'Unione europea basata su tre pilastri: le Comunità europee, la politica estera e di sicurezza comune (PESC) e la cooperazione nel settore della giustizia e degli affari interni (JHI). In vista dell'allargamento dell'Unione, il trattato di Amsterdam ha apportato gli adeguamenti necessari per consentire all'Unione di funzionare in modo più efficiente e democratico.
I. Il trattato di Maastricht

Il trattato sull'Unione europea, firmato a Maastricht il 7 febbraio 1992, è entrato in vigore il 1 ° novembre 1993.
a.Le strutture dell'Unione

Istituendo un'Unione europea, il trattato di Maastricht ha segnato un nuovo passo nel processo di creazione di un'unione sempre più stretta tra i popoli dell'Europa. L'Unione era basata sulle Comunità europee (1.1.1 e 1.1.2) e sostenuta dalle politiche e forme di cooperazione previste dal trattato sull'Unione europea. Aveva una struttura istituzionale unica, composta dal Consiglio, dal Parlamento europeo, dalla Commissione europea, dalla Corte di giustizia e dalla Corte dei conti che (essendo al momento strettamente le uniche istituzioni dell'UE) esercitavano i loro poteri conformemente ai trattati . Il trattato istituiva un Comitato economico e sociale e un Comitato delle regioni, entrambi dotati di poteri consultivi. Un sistema europeo di banche centrali e una Banca centrale europea sono stati istituiti a norma delle disposizioni del trattato in aggiunta alle istituzioni finanziarie esistenti nel gruppo BEI, ossia la Banca europea per gli investimenti e il Fondo europeo per gli investimenti.
b.I poteri dell'Unione

L'Unione creata dal trattato di Maastricht riceveva determinati poteri dal trattato, che erano classificati in tre gruppi e venivano comunemente definiti "pilastri": il primo "pilastro" era costituito dalle Comunità europee, fornendo un quadro entro il quale i poteri per quale sovranità fosse stata trasferita dagli Stati membri nei settori disciplinati dal trattato erano esercitati dalle istituzioni comunitarie. Il secondo "pilastro" era la politica estera e di sicurezza comune prevista al titolo V del trattato. Il terzo "pilastro" era la cooperazione nei settori della giustizia e degli affari interni di cui al titolo VI del trattato. I titoli V e VI prevedevano la cooperazione intergovernativa con le istituzioni comuni, con alcune caratteristiche sovranazionali come il coinvolgimento della Commissione e la consultazione del Parlamento.

1. La Comunità europea (primo pilastro)

Il compito della Comunità era quello di far funzionare il mercato unico e di promuovere, tra l'altro, uno sviluppo armonioso, equilibrato e sostenibile delle attività economiche, un elevato livello di occupazione, protezione sociale e parità tra uomini e donne. La Comunità ha perseguito questi obiettivi, agendo nei limiti delle sue competenze, istituendo un mercato comune e le misure connesse di cui all'articolo 3 del trattato CE e avviando la politica economica e monetaria unica di cui all'articolo 4. Le attività comunitarie dovevano rispettare il principio di proporzionalità e, in settori che non rientrano nella sua competenza esclusiva, il principio di sussidiarietà (articolo 5 CE).
2. Politica estera e di sicurezza comune (PESC) (secondo pilastro)

L'Unione aveva il compito di definire e attuare, mediante metodi intergovernativi, una politica estera e di sicurezza comune (6.1.1). Gli Stati membri dovevano sostenere questa politica attivamente e senza riserve in uno spirito di lealtà e solidarietà reciproca. I suoi obiettivi erano: salvaguardare i valori comuni, gli interessi fondamentali, l'indipendenza e l'integrità dell'Unione in conformità con i principi della Carta delle Nazioni Unite; rafforzare la sicurezza dell'Unione in tutti i modi; promuovere la cooperazione internazionale; sviluppare e consolidare la democrazia e lo Stato di diritto e il rispetto dei diritti umani e delle libertà fondamentali.
3.Cooperazione nei settori della giustizia e degli affari interni (terzo pilastro)

L'obiettivo dell'Unione era sviluppare un'azione comune in questi settori mediante metodi intergovernativi (5.12.1) per fornire ai cittadini un elevato livello di sicurezza in uno spazio di libertà, sicurezza e giustizia. Ha coperto le seguenti aree:

    
norme e l'esercizio dei controlli sull'attraversamento delle frontiere esterne della Comunità;
    
lotta al terrorismo, alla criminalità grave, al traffico di droga e alla frode internazionale;
    
cooperazione giudiziaria in materia penale e civile;
    
creazione di un Ufficio europeo di polizia (Europol) con un sistema di scambio di informazioni tra le forze di polizia nazionali;
    
controllare l'immigrazione clandestina;
    
politica comune in materia di asilo.

II. Il trattato di Amsterdam

Il trattato di Amsterdam che modifica il trattato sull'Unione europea, i trattati che istituiscono le Comunità europee e alcuni atti connessi, firmato ad Amsterdam il 2 ottobre 1997, è entrato in vigore il 1 ° maggio 1999.
a.Aumentati poteri per l'Unione
1. Comunità europea

Per quanto riguarda gli obiettivi, è stata data particolare importanza allo sviluppo equilibrato e sostenibile e all'alto livello di occupazione. È stato istituito un meccanismo per coordinare le politiche degli Stati membri in materia di occupazione e vi era la possibilità di alcune misure comunitarie in questo settore. L'accordo sulla politica sociale è stato incorporato nel trattato CE con alcuni miglioramenti (rimozione dell'opt-out). Il metodo comunitario si applicava ora ad alcuni dei principali settori che fino ad allora erano rientrati nel "terzo pilastro" come l'asilo, l'immigrazione, l'attraversamento delle frontiere esterne, la lotta alle frodi, la cooperazione doganale e la cooperazione giudiziaria in materia civile, oltre a parte della cooperazione Accordo di Schengen, che l'UE e le Comunità hanno approvato integralmente.
2. Unione Europea

La cooperazione intergovernativa nei settori della cooperazione giudiziaria e di polizia è stata rafforzata definendo obiettivi e compiti precisi e creando un nuovo strumento giuridico simile a una direttiva. Gli strumenti della politica estera e di sicurezza comune sono stati sviluppati successivamente, in particolare creando un nuovo strumento, la strategia comune, un nuovo ufficio, il "Segretario generale del Consiglio responsabile per la PESC" e una nuova struttura, la " Unità di pianificazione politica e allarme rapido '.

b. Una posizione più forte per il Parlamento
1. Potenza giuridica

In base alla procedura di codecisione, che è stata estesa alle 15 basi giuridiche esistenti ai sensi del trattato CE, il Parlamento e il Consiglio sono diventati colegislatori su un piano praticamente paritetico. Ad eccezione della politica agricola e della concorrenza, la procedura di codecisione si applicava a tutte le aree in cui il Consiglio poteva prendere decisioni a maggioranza qualificata. In quattro casi (articoli 18, 42 e 47 e articolo 151 sulla politica culturale, che sono rimasti invariati) la procedura di codecisione è stata combinata con l'obbligo di una decisione unanime in sede di Consiglio. Gli altri settori legislativi in ​​cui era richiesta l'unanimità non erano soggetti alla codecisione.
2. Potere di controllo

Oltre a votare per approvare la Commissione in quanto organo, il Parlamento ha anche votato per approvare in anticipo la persona nominata presidente della futura Commissione (articolo 214).
3. Elezione e statuto dei membri

Per quanto riguarda la procedura per le elezioni del Parlamento a suffragio universale diretto (articolo 190 CE), il potere della Comunità di adottare principi comuni è stato aggiunto al potere esistente di adottare una procedura uniforme. Nello stesso articolo è stata inclusa una base giuridica che consente di adottare uno statuto unico per i deputati. Tuttavia, non esisteva ancora alcuna disposizione che consentisse misure per lo sviluppo di partiti politici a livello europeo (vedi articolo 191).
c.La cooperazione più flessibile

Per la prima volta, i trattati contenevano disposizioni generali che consentono a taluni Stati membri, a determinate condizioni, di avvalersi delle istituzioni comuni per organizzare una cooperazione più stretta tra loro. Questa opzione si è aggiunta a una più stretta cooperazione coperta da disposizioni specifiche, quali l'unione economica e monetaria, la creazione dello spazio di libertà, sicurezza e giustizia e l'integrazione delle disposizioni di Schengen. Le aree in cui era possibile una più stretta cooperazione erano il terzo pilastro e, in condizioni particolarmente restrittive, le materie soggette a competenza comunitaria non esclusiva. Le condizioni che ogni cooperazione più stretta doveva soddisfare e le procedure decisionali pianificate erano state elaborate in modo tale da garantire che questo nuovo fattore nel processo di integrazione rimanesse eccezionale e, in ogni caso, potesse essere utilizzato solo per andare oltre verso l'integrazione e non prendere provvedimenti retrogradi.

b. Una posizione più forte per il Parlamento
1. Potenza giuridica

In base alla procedura di codecisione, che è stata estesa alle 15 basi giuridiche esistenti ai sensi del trattato CE, il Parlamento e il Consiglio sono diventati colegislatori su un piano praticamente paritetico. Ad eccezione della politica agricola e della concorrenza, la procedura di codecisione si applicava a tutte le aree in cui il Consiglio poteva prendere decisioni a maggioranza qualificata. In quattro casi (articoli 18, 42 e 47 e articolo 151 sulla politica culturale, che sono rimasti invariati) la procedura di codecisione è stata combinata con l'obbligo di una decisione unanime in sede di Consiglio. Gli altri settori legislativi in ​​cui era richiesta l'unanimità non erano soggetti alla codecisione.
2. Potere di controllo

Oltre a votare per approvare la Commissione in quanto organo, il Parlamento ha anche votato per approvare in anticipo la persona nominata presidente della futura Commissione (articolo 214).
3. Elezione e statuto dei membri

Per quanto riguarda la procedura per le elezioni del Parlamento a suffragio universale diretto (articolo 190 CE), il potere della Comunità di adottare principi comuni è stato aggiunto al potere esistente di adottare una procedura uniforme. Nello stesso articolo è stata inclusa una base giuridica che consente di adottare uno statuto unico per i deputati. Tuttavia, non esisteva ancora alcuna disposizione che consentisse misure per lo sviluppo di partiti politici a livello europeo (vedi articolo 191).
c.La cooperazione più flessibile

Per la prima volta, i trattati contenevano disposizioni generali che consentono a taluni Stati membri, a determinate condizioni, di avvalersi delle istituzioni comuni per organizzare una cooperazione più stretta tra loro. Questa opzione si è aggiunta a una più stretta cooperazione coperta da disposizioni specifiche, quali l'unione economica e monetaria, la creazione dello spazio di libertà, sicurezza e giustizia e l'integrazione delle disposizioni di Schengen. Le aree in cui era possibile una più stretta cooperazione erano il terzo pilastro e, in condizioni particolarmente restrittive, le materie soggette a competenza comunitaria non esclusiva. Le condizioni che ogni cooperazione più stretta doveva soddisfare e le procedure decisionali pianificate erano state elaborate in modo tale da garantire che questo nuovo fattore nel processo di integrazione rimanesse eccezionale e, in ogni caso, potesse essere utilizzato solo per andare oltre verso l'integrazione e non prendere provvedimenti retrogradi.

Cerca nel sito

200023467-e8a58ea570/50000000.jpg